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Residence on 5th Avenue​

New York City, NY

2014

A new guest house and library building located on the historic Penkridge Hall Estate in Shropshire, England, the original house structure of which was constructed 1532. As the precise construction site defined the location of a former 12th century Templar Chapel, and has other significant historic associations, the organization Historic England rigorously determines what can and cannot be constructed. This design accordingly, uses the historic materials and forms from the local context along with a sympathetic reinvention of the diagonal Tudor geometries used in the Estate’s primary house. The project goal is to produce a building that neither simply remakes the forms of yesteryear nor dismisses the desire to produce a project of contemporary value.  The design for the Penkridge Hall annex asks how architecture can re-imagine the British traditions of materiality, geometry, picturesque massing and high-resolution detailing in a new way that capitalizes on ways of making things enabled by emerging digital technology. This project is inherently critical of the emerging a culture of buildings that are limited to being assembled from a palette of bland products made by large, impersonal corporations with no connection to local sites.